Why and How: Seeking Inspiration in Nature Photography - Part 2

For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.

How Seeking Inspiration in Nature Photography

There is no “miracle recipe” for inspiration.

In our case, it is a state of absolute well-being in which we are free from all material contingencies, far from the media noise and hubbub of the great metropolises where 90% of people are working pointlessly and without purpose. Only the contemplation of nature in its truest and most raw material enables us to reach that state of grace in which we can reflect and define the collections we are about to make. For example, it is difficult for us to find inspiration in a public garden that has been set up by human beings. When we seek regions of nature as a source of serenity, we go to the mountains or to remote places where the hand of man has not yet shaped the forms.

We are humbled when we are inspired. When we are inspired, we create in excess, whereas when it is not present, we wait patiently until it manifests.

One thing is certain: when we are in representation or when we are doing billing, accounting, business communication, or marketing, we are not sure where to find inspiration. We do not waste time trying to create in these inefficient periods because it can upset the smooth running of our commercial society. While patiently waiting for these tasks to be completed, we are in limbo, waiting to rediscover that mystical state of inspiration: a physical person and a spirit wandering in another world made of lights, colors and shapes.

This may sound strange, but it is the reality. To find inspiration, we must be in a special state where tranquility and serenity reign. In the next paragraphs, we will develop how we proceed.

We Are Not Mystics

We have often talked with other photographers about this issue of inspiration. Some have told us about a state of trance, a state of communication with another world. Some photographers claim that a person creates through them as if they were only puppets of an external force.

We are not in this state of mind when we are inspired. We are rigorous in our work. We know our limits and we are pragmatic. We have extensive scientific training. We think that everything has an explanation even if we do not know it yet. Moreover, we have economic obligations linked to our company: we must keep them in mind for our employees who depend on us.

For us, inspiration is ultimately a state where the monotonous bridges to daily work are severed from the outside world. We are given the ability to refocus on the search for the creation of unusual photos with high emotional potential.

Inspiration Is Not Found but Cultivated

We do not know how to “find” inspiration. For years, we tried to force inspiration, which resulted in stress and disappointment. After many years of experience, we have concluded that it is inspiration that discovers us, so we are patient and do not rush this process.

We are used to saying that it is crucial to be slow and allow creativity to slowly surround us. Utilizing the five senses, we experience new emotions. Once all the miniscule seeds of creativity are planted, we patiently wait for them to expand. This time of growth varies from weeks to months. During this time, we often carry out our commercial and marketing tasks.

When we harvest all our efforts, we tirelessly work for weeks, suffering from a creative disorder, like the eating disorder bulimia.

Cultivating inspiration is not an overused expression. With patience, by sowing small seeds of inspiration, we can reap the fruits of our expectation.

Seeking Inspiration Requires Fulness

Stressful everyday problems are obstacles to the quest for the creative vision.

To find inspiration, we delve deep within ourselves, meditating to regain calm and serenity. When we are on business trips, networking, or marketing our art photographs, we are not in a peacefully inspiring state of mind. We know that we are experiencing a period of intense stress during which material contingencies take precedence over creativity. These periods of commercial communication or marketing are necessary to live because they financially pave the road for our future collections of fine art photographs. Marketing is a necessity that we cannot escape.

But often, after weeks of traveling or performing, we need time to recover the richness involved for incredible photos. We cease our commercial actions, and focus on finding inspiration yet again, often by immersing ourselves in the beauty of nature. During these periods of serenity, we remain open to our environment, alert to the first signs of inspiration.

We believe that isolating ourselves from the world, and social media allows us to better comprehend the nature of future photography creations. Generally, the photographic themes for our collections reveal themselves. It is as if our unconscious can discern what is truly interesting and important, thus guiding us towards new creative directions. We must let our soul and our emotions speak. This state of trance is impossible to find during business or marketing; it can only be found in isolation.

Many artistic projects start with the eminent seeds of inspiration that we have mentioned. Initially, we “tinker”, that is, we proceed through trial and error. Our foundational idea gradually becomes stronger over time.

Inspiration is often aroused from our dreams and imagination. Far away from the daily hubbub of our society, our inner peace can allow the emergence of interesting collections.

For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.
For this collection of art pictures devoted to monkeys, we worked for 3 years in remote areas.

Seeking Inspiration Is an Active Process

When inspiration is not the result of our photographic work, we must constantly search for it. This treasure cannot be discovered by merely sitting in an office chair. We must immerse ourselves in diversity to provoke a spark. One way of accomplishing this is by dreaming. When we seek inspiration, we must specifically ask for it by venturing further on the creative plane. We must discover the overwhelming desire to go beyond our current goals for future photographs. We must not be satisfied with a simple result, but we must question what we have already achieved. This is how we create the spark of inspiration.

These paragraphs may seem nebulous, nevertheless they hold essential principles for the search for inspiration.

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